Resources

Since 1993, Safeskies’ biennial conferences have featured hundreds of thought-provoking presentations on all aspects of aviation safety—from domestic and international practitioners. Tapping into these presentations and other sources, this resources section will bring together some diverse perspectives to create a growing aviation safety reference centre.

Accidents and accident investigation

There is a saying that ‘aviation rules are written in blood’—they often follow accidents, especially where there are fatalities, in an attempt to improve safety. Below are some key Australian domestic accidents, many of which have led to new safety regulations. 

Operations

There is a saying that ‘aviation rules are written in blood’—they often follow accidents, especially where there are fatalities, in an attempt to improve safety. Below are some key Australian domestic accidents, many of which have led to new safety regulations. 

Airports

Airspace

Airworthiness

Flight Operations

Ground handling

Human factors

‘Structurally sound aircraft plummet to Earth, ships run aground in calm seas, industrial machines run awry, and the instruments of medical science maim and kill unsuspecting patients, all because of incompatibilities between the way things are designed and the way people perceive, think, and act. (Steven Casey, Set phasers on stun: and other true tales of design, technology, and human error, 1993)

Considering human factors as an important part of aviation safety has been a focus of Safeskies’ conferences from the beginning. Dr John Lauber, of the US NTSB, presented on ‘Including the Human Factor’ at the first conference in 1993, the same year as Casey’s quote above.

The 2019 conference featured a series of lectures focusing on human factors, in honour of Dr Rob Lee, human factors and safety management expert, who died on 27 April 2018.

Brent Hayward

Dr Rob Lee memorial system safety/ human factors panel session

Dr Wayne Martin

Dr Rob Lee memorial system safety/ human factors panel session

Dr Adam Fletcher

Dr Rob Lee memorial system safety/ human factors panel session

Safety management

There is a saying that ‘aviation rules are written in blood’—they often follow accidents, especially where there are fatalities, in an attempt to improve safety. Below are some key Australian domestic accidents, many of which have led to new safety regulations. 

Training

Training has always been a focus of Safeskies’ conference programs.

The inaugural 1993 conference featured two sessions on training: a presentation on ‘Training and education’ and a workshop session entitled ‘How can training and total quality management address the human factor?’. Fast forward to 2019, and a panel session on day one chaired by Patrick Murray looked at ‘Training for tomorrow’, while the 2015 conference focused entirely on the subject, under the theme, ‘Training for change’.

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Sue Burdekin

Life member of Safeskies from 2020

Most recently, Sue Burdekin was the Aviation Program Coordinator in ADFA’s School of Engineering and Information Technology. She is a highly credentialled academic and researcher in human factors; and has been a senior lecturer in human factors and aviation safety since 2001. She has had experience in GA management and is a commercial pilot. She is a committee member of the Royal Aeronautical Society, a member of the European Association for Aviation Psychology, the Australian Aviation Psychology Association, the International Society of Air Safety Investigation, the Australian Women Pilots’ Association (a former state president), and a former board member of Safeskies.

She and her partner, Dr Robert (Rob) Lee, were regular speakers at Safeskies, bringing their wide-ranging and considerable human factors expertise to the conferences.